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. >>> this morning former editor of "news of the world" rebecca brooks is out of jail. meanwhile scotland yard's top cop resigned amid the phone hacking scandal in great britain. the head of the london police department, sir paul stevenson, resigned. he quit under intense pressure after it was revealed that scotland yard hired a former editor as a media consultant. that editor has also been arrested in connection with the scandal. >> i and the people who know me know that my integrity is completely intact. i may wish we'd have done some things differently, but i'll not lose any sleep over my personal integri integrity. >> british lawmakers are preparing to grill rupert and james murdoch. a parliamentary committee will question the duo about the scandal tomorrow. >>> today money will be flowing at the white house in the form of the nation's most prominent billionaires. president obama is hosting warren buffett and bill and melinda gates along with other members of the giving pledge. the giving pledge was founded by buffett and the gates family last year. it encourages america's wealthiest citizens to
to it is the corruption allegations at scotland yard, the police agency. we're starting today's testimony with the police. >> reporter: that's right. two of the top cops in the country, former metropolitan police commissioner already resigned and then john yates in charge of the phone hacking investigation review he too resigned yesterday. this is how far the scandal has gone. it cast a shadow over scotland yard and everyone now especially lawmakers are trying to get to the bottom of just how much corruption was there, how cozy was the relationship between news of the world and scotland yard. >> it's going to have implications for david cameron's government. andy coleson is being alleged to have known about this when he was heading up the newspaper. >> reporter: this goes to show how it goes to the very hard of politics here basically andy was the chief spin doctor for prime minister david cameron so this is a major embarrassment for him and it's so bad that he's coming back to england early from his trip to south africa specifically to address these phone hacking allegations at a special day of parliame
suggests that you were present at a meeting with scotland yard when police officers conducted a murder investigation providing you with evidence that your newspaper was interfering with the pursuit of justice. he mentioned alex marancak, and a member of the metropolitan police. can you tell us more about that meet stph-g. >> i can tell you something about it, but i was asked to recall a meeting that i'd had at scotland yard in 2002, and i had -- i was asked recently i think by channel 4 if that story was referring to my information. and my recollection of that meeting was entirely different. my recollection of the meeting was on a completely different subject. and so i'm only going on what i was told by channel 4. they say it's a meeting in november that i had, that was what was put to me. i checked my diary as much as possible and there was no meeting in november. however, there was a subsequent meeting in very early january. it may be that it was that meeting. that was not my recollection of the meeting. but on the other hand because of the sarah's law campaign i did have some pretty
about whether a blind eye was turned scotland yard.t >> the dutch military was partly responsible for the deaths of three muslim men during the war. the town was under the protection of u.n. peacekeepers when it was overrun in 1995 and 8000 muslims were killed. >> july, 1995, a so-called u.n. safe area but one that was overrun by bosnian serb forces. the bosnian muslims thought they had the protection of the dutch u.n. peacekeepers. they were wrong. 8000 muslim men and boys were massacred by the bosnian serbs. today in a surprise ruling, a court and the netherlands decided that the dutch government bore some responsibility. >> the presiding judge said the appeals court believed the dutch state had acted illegally towards three bosnian muslims and would have to pay compensation. it has been a long, painful legal ordeal for the relatives of the victims. >> im' after the killers of my family, the serbs, who lives in bosnia. one of them works in the same building i work. can you imagine that? i have to go to my office every day and he is still there. it is one of the cases i have been
aides. he parachuted into scotland in an attempt at peace. after the war, he was imprisoned and killed himself in a berlin prison in 1987. since that time, he had played in this churchyard in a grave caring the epitaph "i am dead." a decision was finally reached between his family and the churches families to exhume the body and cremate the remains and scatter the ashes at sea. lucian freud has died. he was renowned for his portraits, usually of friends and families. >> naked flesh is what fascinated lucian freud. he avoided interviews or appearing on camera. the closest most people got to him was through his many self portraits. >> he reinvented the portrait. he claimed the butcher from being a sort of chocolate box or flattering or soft or inadequate. >> he had been born in berlin and came to britain at age 10. his grandfather was sigmund, his brother was clement. his early work was influenced by surrealism. he had his first one-man show when he was only 21. it was the news -- the new it that became his life work. he said he wanted to paint people. their hopes, their memories. >> in
to scotland, too? does include the issues such as policing that have evolved in scotland? >> it does extend it to scotland. we were able to accept a number of points. there was one specific point that the scottish administration wanted dealt with. it concerned the information commissioner's report. it will be dealt with by the inquiry because it is such an important part of the work. when it comes to the relationship between politicians and media, this inquiry will be able to go where the evidence leads. >> there were allegations against some offices and the metropolitan police. protecting us and doing a wonderful job and should not be smeared by this? >> that's an incredibly important point police officers put their lives on the line for us every single day. and while, of course, we have to get to the bottom of what went wrong in the met, we shouldn't allow that to undermine the public confidence the people have in the bobby on the beat and the fantastic job they do for us. >> mr. richard burton. >> in response from the question from my right honorable friend, the prime minister said if he
of scotland yard-- sir paul stephenson-- also denied wrongdoing. he said he was embarrassed that he'd hired a former "news of the world" executive, neil wallis, as a public relations consultant. wallis has now been arrested. >> i had no reason to connect wallis with phone hacking. i had no reason to doubt his impropriety. nothing had come to my attention. i had no knowledge of the previous inquiry, and i had no reason to enquire of the previous inquiry, and i had been given assurances by a senior grade chief constable that actually there was nothing new. >> brown: away from the hearings, scotland yard announced today it found no outside involvement in the death of sean hoare, a former "news of the world" reporter who'd been an early whistleblower in the scandal. hoare was found dead monday at his home north of london. more now on today's hearings and the murdoch media empire. we're joined, from london, by john burns of "the new york times," and from new york, by david folkenflik, who covers the media for npr. so, john burns, what struck you most about the murdoch's message today? >> well, i
that you were present at a meeting with scotland yard when police officers provided you with evidence that your newspaper was interfering with justice. he particularly mentions the name of another senior executive and at the meeting a man from metropolitan police, that "news of the world" were guilty of interference and attempt to credit -- discredit a police officer and his wife. can you tell us more about that meeting? >> well, i can tell you something about it but it's -- i was asked to recall a meeting that i had at scotland yard in 2002. i was asked recently, i think by channel 4, about the story you're referring to. my information -- my recollection of that meeting was entirely different. my recollection of the meeting was on a completely different subject so i'm only going on what i was told by channel 4. they say it's a meeting in november but that's what was put to me. i checked my diary as much as possible and there was no meeting in november. however, there was a subsequent meeting and in very early january, so it may be that it was that meeting. that was not my recollectio
that scotland yard has made an arrest in the scandal that has rocked rupert murdoch's media empire and yet another remainor how serious the hacking investigation is. london's top police officer faces a public grilling today. dan rivers is on that for us. dan, what do you think? >> reporter: paul stevenson, the top policeman in the uk, is being questioned at the moment by the metropolitan police authority. particularly coming under pressure because, this morning, they arrested a former deputy editor i "the news of the world" neil wallace, arrest number nine as part of this and the other inquiry into corrupt or bribing police officials for information. now, the important thing is here is already we know one of the senior policemen in scotland yard john yates has already admitted having lunches with neil wallace, the man now arrested. a lot of pressure on one senior policeman, john yates, therefore, top pleasure on the top policemen. rupert and james murdoch are hounded in the people behind the building me to come and appear and justify what happened in their newspapers. james murdoch saying
. >> absolutely. scotland yard has been embarrassed by the whole situation. scotland yard is taking a very aggressive tactic addressing rebekah brooke. they are getting involve and they not only sounded like they didn't run their newspapers, they sound like they didn't even head their newspapers. anyone who read news of the world or the sun could tell that there were hacked voice mails in there and they had no idea they didn't have the proof. >> give us perspective he was passionate about newspapers. >> sure. this was the best selling newspaper in britain a lot of people and analysts within news corp. said why don't we get rid of the non-money makers and other media venchers. murdoch is an old newspaper man and that's how we came up. he has a sentimental attachment to the papers and when it comes to this side of the atlantic where he keeps the new york post and loses a lot of money and has a lot of influence in new york and nationally, it's because it's part of his power base. that paper and other outlets provide coverage to people who she sympathetic to. not as people who are on the other
for questioning and found herself under arrest. hours later, britain's top police officer, the chief of scotland yard resigned, and he acknowledges that the investigation was inadequate, and steven yates now announcing his resignation. the scandal has been growing steadily after reports that there was a hacking of an answering machine by "news of the world." tomorrow murdoch and his son james are scheduled to appear on a hearing in parliament. cnn will bring you that testimony live. dan rivers is inla london. rebekah brooks is expected to testify tomorrow, and now what are the plans in terms of questioning her tomorrow? >> reporter: well, politicians will have to be careful how they frame the questions to her. in britain, if there is a pending trial or the possibility of a pending trial, you have to be very careful what kind of news coverage is gained from that, because they don't want to prejudge the trial here. they don't want to sway a potential juror one way or the other. and this testimony from rebekah brooks will be broadcast live not only here but around the world. they have to be fairly
of the world" also worked simultaneously, if you'll pardon the pun, as a translator for scotland yard. there was also somebody who was working both as the chief correspondent -- or chief reporter of the paper. as a police informant. so the -- there was almost no delineation at times between where news international finished around scland yard began. it was really extraordinary. >> rose: there was a headline,lm reuters saying, is britain more corrupt it thinks? >> i tnk we need to be careful before moving too far in that direction. this is not italy. this is certainly not a banana republic. what we've seen is an entangling of media and politicians and police, a kind of causeuasi new establishment with roles not being clearly enough defined. i think the second point to makeis that let's not forget britain has a very vibrant competitive press. and this story was exposed, not by a police inquire race, not by a parliamentary committee, but by a leading british newspaper "the guardian," helped a little bit by "the new york times," which crucially broke the story that broke the news internat
are getting reports this morning scotland yards made an arrest in connection with the news corporation's phone hacking scandal. london's top cop is going to be in the hot seat today. let's bring in dan rivers. he has the latest live in london this morning. good morning, dan. >> reporter: good morning, yeah. another arrest this morning in this police inquiry. we understand that may be a former editor of "the news of the world." that's according to sky news here. he has been arrested this morning, taken into police custody. no comment from the news international themselves. the bigger picture here is there's still confusion about this request for the embamted chi chief. they are all being told to come and report to a committee here on tuesday. the deadline for them to respond is this morning. so far the committee had no response. this is pretty serious stuff. they can't force rupert and james murdoch to appear but they can force rebecca brooks to appear. if she continues to refuse to respond, issue a summons to her, they receiptcally they could send their security apparatus of the house behind m
of the metropolitan police, refer to as scotland yard, have worked for news international advising them in a pr capacity. what worked for the government. there is this kind of seedy revolving door between the police and as powerful media company. as i said, when it is calms down a little, police need to look at self-policing, especially with regard to what people do after they left. but it also seems to be an issue plane corruption. police were being bribed by journalists to provide information. that could end up, as the caller said, it has not been that big a part of the story yet. we could have police facing disciplinary hearings if not criminal prosecutions. host: do you see potential of this bringing down the camden government? guest: -- cameron government? guest: people are beginning to think that. if he had an election in six months, it would be serious. it does not look very good. the scandal last year broke a lot of trust in politicians. now you have got a prime minister who appointed someone, his former communications director, a former editor of "news of the world" when the hacking wa
family are gathering for another royal wedding, tomorrow in scotland. hop on that flight. >> join that, cbs news royal contributor victoria arbiter. nice to have you back. >> good morning, good to be here. >> zara philips, where does she figure into the royal lineage? >> the queen's oldest granddaughter, 13th to the throne, daughter of princess anne and first husband captain mark phillips and very accomplished equestrian, hoping to compete in london, physical therapist, has her own fashion line for sportswear, accomplished young lady. >> very modern young princess. >> the guy is mike tindell, captain of the england rugby team. >> looks very rugby. >> broken his nose nine times. they were introduced by prince harry in 2003. she's not an official princess. they are down-to-earth modern monarchy. >> she's 13th in line so a lot has to happen. i'm kidding. what type of wedding will it be? we saw the pomp and circumstance with will and kate's wedding? will it be any of the same? >> no, not a tiara to be seen. expecting 300 guests. it is in edinburgh. security is intense and there's no room.
international parliame looked at scotland yard's initial phone hacking investigation back in 2005 and 2006. the report rips the chief investigator who left the police force and eventually took a job at news international. it slams news international for its "deliberate attempts to block police." david cameron called parliament into special session to discuss the phone hacking scandal. cameron and his predecessors have been criticized for their ties to news corp. chairman rupert murdoch and the people who run his london media operation. >> the public expects is not petty political point scoring but a -- what they want, what they deserve is concerted action to rise to the level of events and pledge to work together to sort this issue out once and for all. and it is in that spirit that i commend this statement to the house. >> in this country, a new debt ceiling compromise seems to be getting traction in washington. six senators, three republicans, and three democrats are offering a plan to cut the nation's debt by about $3.7 trillion over the next decade. it includes spending cuts a
you something about it. i was asked to recall the meeting at scotland yard in 2002. i was off recently by channel 4 about the story. my information, my recollection of that meeting was entirely different. my recollection is the meeting was on a completely different subject. i am only going on what i was told by channel 4. the meeting in november, that was what was put to me. i checked my diary as much as possible. no meeting in november. but subsequently, very early january it may be that meeting was not my recollection of the meeting. on the other hand, i did have some regular meetings. >> rupert murdoch said he relied on lieutenants that he trusted. who would you trust? >> the news room at any newspaper is trust. if you think about -- i am sure paul farrelly would agree. think about way a story gets published it depends on trust. you rely on people that work for you to behave in a proper manner and you rely on the information you are given at the time. that is why i am with the committee today about the interception of milly dowler's voicemail not commenting on what other people knew
of the world" owner news international parliament looked at scotland yard's initial phone hacking investigation back in 2005 and 2006. the report rips the chief investigator who left the police force and eventually took a job at news international. it slams news international for its "deliberate attempts to block police." david
of the phone hacking surrounding "news of the world.." >> thousands targeted according to scotland yard and thousands of victims haven't been informed yet. much more on this coming up. we're going to be talking to john burns, "new york times" london bureau chief about what is next in this investigation. mine was earned over the south pacific in 1943. vietnam, 1967. i got mine in iraq, 2003. u.s.a.a. auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation, because it offers a superior level of protection and because u.s.a.a.'s commitment to serve the military, veterans, and their families is without equal. begin your legacy. get an auto insurance quote. u.s.a.a. we know what it means to serve. with two children and no way to support them. people told me i wasn't going to do anything. and i just decided i have more to offer than that. i put myself through nursing school, and then i decided to go get a doctorate degree. university of phoenix gave me the knowledge to make a difference in people's lives. my name is dr. kimberly horton. i manage a network of over a thousand nurses,
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)